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5. Publication of information notices

According to Section 9 (1 and 2):
“… the Registrar may serve… (an “information notice”) on… any registered person; any
person who is not entered in the Register, but whom the Registrar has reasonable
grounds for believing to be a consultant lobbyist…”

According to Section 9 (7):
“…Where an Information Notice has been served on a person, the Registrar may cancel it by serving written notice to that effect on the person…”

I intend to keep the issuing of Information Notices, responses and cancellations confidential in the vast majority of circumstances. It would not be my intention to publish Information Notices, responses or cancellations, or to confirm that such have been issued, received or cancelled, as a matter of routine (though see section on Freedom of Information), although I do retain the right to publish if I feel that to do so would be in the public interest. In the event that information received as a result of an Information Notice, has an effect on the Register, I retain the right to annotate the Register accordingly (e.g. record updated on date in accordance with Information Notice number), if I consider it in the public interest to do so

According to Section 11 (1):
“…A person on whom an Information Notice has been served may appeal to the Tribunal against the Notice…” The Tribunal in this case, is the General Regulatory Chamber. According to Section 11 (2): “…If an appeal is brought under this section, the person is not required to supply the information until the date on which the appeal is finally determined or withdrawn…”

According to the rules of the General Regulatory Chamber, the recipient usually has 28 calendar days to submit an appeal from the date of the decision (to issue an Information Notice). The end to end process from when the appeal is submitted to when the appeal is heard (which may not be in public) is on average up to 30 weeks. Currently tribunals do not routinely publish their decisions, though I am advised that work is underway on decisions database where all tribunals will present their decisions for the public to be able to view.

In the event of an appeal made in respect of an Information Notice, I retain the right to publish the decision of the Tribunal on my website. For the avoidance of doubt, I would not intend to publish any information prior to the Tribunal decision. In the event that this decision (which is binding on all parties) has effect on the Register, I retain the right to annotate the Register accordingly (e.g. record updated on date in accordance with Tribunal decision reference), if I consider it in the public interest to do so.